Lifestyles

Artist Suspends 1.6 Million Hand-Tied Knots Over a Historic Plaza in Spain

Sara Barnes # Lifestyles
janet_echelman_madrid_installation

Visitors to Madrid’s Plaza Mayor will be greeted by a dazzling installation by artistJanet Echelman. Known for her suspended thread sculptures, this site-specific fiber art is called 1.78 Madrid and represents the latest work in her Earth Time series that started in 2010. Comprising 1.6 million hand-tied knots, this new network is 15 times stronger than steel by weight, but it will gently move if struck by a passing breeze.

Clad in oranges, pinks, purples, and reds, the see-through sculpture electrifies the historic buildings below; Echelman’s work hovers over the plaza’s statue of King Philip III like an electric cloud. Although it descends like a looming alien spaceship, the abstract form gets its title from the number of microseconds that “a day on Earth was shortened as a result of the 2011 Earthquake in Japan.”

Echelman’s installation was installed to mark the 400th anniversary of Madrid. Conceptually, it comments on time—including its passing and its various scales, from a single day to entire centuries.

“In the last four hundred years people have gathered at Plaza Mayor to witness bull-fights and Spanish Inquisition burnings,”
Echelman said.
“Today we gather together with art that explores our concept of time, to discuss ideas. This is a hopeful trajectory for humanity.”

Echelman’s interest in time is particularly geared towards those living in metropolises, who are often swept up in the energy of the urban environment and lack the opportunity for reflection.

“I feel a need to find moments of contemplation in the midst of daily city life,”
Echelman explained.
“If my art can create an opportunity to contemplate the larger cycles of time and remind us to listen to our inner selves, I believe this can be the start of transformation.”

If you’re local to Madrid, 1.78 Madrid is currently available to view until February 19, 2018.

Comprising 1.6 million hand-tied knots, this network will gently move if struck by a breeze.

1.78 Madrid, a Sculpture by Janet Echelman

Echelman has titled this piece 1.78 Madrid after “the amount of time that a day on Earth was shortened as a result of the 2011 Earthquake in Japan.”

1.78 Madrid, a Sculpture by Janet Echelman

The piece invites us to contemplate time in various scales, from a single day to four centuries.

Fiber Art Installation by Janet Echelman

Fiber Art Installation by Janet Echelman

Janet Echelman Fiber Art

Fiber Art Installation by Janet Echelman

1.78 Madrid, a Sculpture by Janet Echelman

1.78 Madrid, a Sculpture by Janet Echelman

Fiber Art Installation by Janet Echelman

Janet Echelman Fiber Art